Toque o’ the Morning

Download Blue Beanie Day toque for your avatar. Illustration by Kevin Cornell.

Monday, November 30th, 2009 marks the third annual International Blue Beanie Day in Support of Web Standards. Don a blue toque to show your support for web standards, grab a photo of yourself sporting said headgear, and upload it to the Blue Beanie Day 2009 photo pool on Flickr. Got an illustrated Twitter/Flickr avatar? Give it a blue beanie designed by Kevin Cornell. Download the zipped Photoshop file here.

Short URL: zeldman.com/?p=2774

97 thoughts on “Toque o’ the Morning

  1. Hi Jeffrey Zeldman!!! It’s really you? You are designer of blogger.com? If yes, I have one question for you!- ” How I can to change the place for name of the blog. I needed that title would have been in the right corner! Maybe you know what I can to do???? Please help me.

  2. Next year, sound the alarm ahead of time! I live in sub-tropical Naples, Florida and finding a toque at a local store anywhere nearby is highly unlikely.
    I’m wearing an imaginary one, though. Happy third.

  3. Yo, JZ: just dropping in to wish you a happy web standards day. I have your book, and have read it, and look forward to any future ones.

    I always adhere strictly to web standards in my own and clients’ websites. I have a blue beanie, but won’t weigh in with a photo… I’ll just do it (adherence): that’s my small contribution. Enjoy, anyway.

  4. I’ve been using the verb “don” all day thanks to you! Oh, and I told my boss about your book a couple months ago, citing the infinite praise scattered across the web. Sigh… she ordered the first edition.

    (last attempt… it’s a shame that I am conditioned to copy every textarea input to my clipboard before submitting)

  5. what is all that blue beanie about? can anybody explain me?

    @hostels barcelona :

    Follow the link to the Blue Beanie Day page on Facebook. It explains:

    The third annual Blue Beanie Day will be celebrated on Monday, November 30th, 2009

    Thousands of Standardistas (people who support web standards) will wear a Blue Beanie to show their support for accessible, semantic web content.

    It’s easy to show your support for web design done right. Beg, borrow, or buy a Blue Beanie and snap a photo of your mug wearing the blue. (Or get creative with Photoshop). Then on November 30, switch your profile picture in Facebook, Twitter, Flickr, (and any other social network) and post your photo to the Blue Beanie Day group … watch for more information coming soon.

    Tweetups and Beanie-ups are being planned all over the globe … watch for more information coming soon…

    see also http://www.flickr.com/groups/bluebeanieday2009/

  6. I had a client who owns an Austin knitting shop email me yesterday asking if I’d heard of a guy named Zeldman & why are there so many people wanting to buy / make blue beanies: http://bit.ly/33ecEb Looks like there might be an army of blue beanies forming in the lone star state.

  7. I’m also trying to throw away all “old-school methods”, but i have a great problem. If i create a site from the very beginning, then everything is ok, i can create clean css & xhtml. But in time, when small site update is required, i apply these old-school… And i don’t know how to solve this problem.

  8. Seriously??? A blue beanie… we’re IT. We sit in climate controlled buildings and rarely venture outside. Why would we need beanies? And isn’t Web 2.0 supposed to be for presentation, usability, content, and standards…. why not everybody dress in a suit day. IT people are known for dressing down, more co-workers would ask why are you wearing a suit instead of thinking wtf is with that beanie.

  9. IT people are known for dressing down, more co-workers would ask why are you wearing a suit instead of thinking wtf is with that beanie.

    Good point. It’s true. If all web designers dressed to the nines on November 30, it would do more to raise eyebrows and get people talking.

    Nevertheless, the event is Blue Beanie Day.

    It might have a little something to do with this book.

  10. Jeffrey – thanks – I am new to web design (I am in marketing) so its an inevitable relationship bound to be a love-hate roller coaster and I need all the supportive info I can get!

  11. Are tuques beanies?! I would have come up with a bunch of knit hat synonyms before I characterized what Zeldman was wearing as a ‘beanie.’ (No propeller. No button at the top. Alternating triangular wedges of color? Nope.)

    Perhaps you youngsters should go google ‘beanie 1960s’.

    But yeah, standards good. Standards way good. Heck even blue Stetson good.

  12. Does wearing certain colored headgear actually change world policy in regard to web standards? Would green bandana mitigate global warming and white socks ward off tigers?

    Fun is fun, and a community spirit is a community spirit, so I’m a little happy about this, but I’m simultaneously counter-happy because it only goes to show that we can rally pretend support.

  13. we can rally pretend support.

    @Sandra:

    I hear you, but I don’t think demonstrations of solidarity are pretend support. Like the recent wearing of green in Iran (not to equate these two events at all!), they are an expression of will and desire by some of the people, and they raise awareness among other people. If enough people raise enough awareness over a long enough period of time, policies change. And even without policy change, personal change makes a difference. (Again, not to simplistically equate different things, but merely to make a point about how change works, if enough people stop being racist, it could end racism, even if a country had racist laws on the books. And once enough people stop being racist, laws change.)

    Web standards are continually gaining momentum; accessible, semantic markup is coming, one designer/developer and one site at a time. It’s exciting and good, and this blue hat thing, however silly in itself, is an expression of good and powerful change.

  14. Great idea! I’m not sure how much of an effect it will have though, after all most of the people that aren’t using web standards or aren’t using a standards compliant browser either aren’t interested in changing or can’t change for any number of reasons. I deal with some of them on a regular basis and it is something that is extremely frustrating but some are just so set in their ways that any notion of change is beyond them, no matter what benefits there are.

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