What’s new in DWWS 3e

Designing With Web Standards, 3rd Edition

The 3rd Edition of Designing With Web Standards is coming soon to a bookstore near you. Abetted mightily by our secret cabal of interns, co-author Ethan Marcotte, technical editor Aaron Gustafson, copyeditor Rose Weisburd, editor Erin Kissane and I have worked hard to create what we hope is not merely an update, but a significant revision to the foundational web standards text.

Packed with new ideas

After years of stasis, the world of standards-based design is exploding with new ideas and possibilities. Designing With Web Standards 3rd Edition captures this moment, makes sense of it, and keeps you smartly ahead of the pack.

From HTML 5 to web fonts, CSS3 to WCAG2, the latest technologies, claims and counter-claims get broken down in classic DWWS style into their easy-to-understand component ideas, helping you pick the course of action that works best for your projects. As always, the core ideas of standards-based design (which never change) get presented with clear insights and up-to-date examples. You’ll find strategies for persuading even the most stubborn boss or client to support accessibility or reconsider what “IE6 support” means—and for handling the other problems we face when trying to bring rational design and development to the unruly web.

Now with more “how”

While this 3rd Edition, like its predecessors, spends a great deal of time on “why,” it also features a lot more “how” than past editions. If you loved the ideas in DWWS, but wished the book was a bit more hands-on, this is the edition you’ve waited for.

Oh, and the color this time? It’s blue, like l’amour.

Pre-order and save

A few chapters remain to be written, but the goal is in sight, and the book will be out this Fall. To celebrate, you can now save 37% when you pre-order Designing With Web Standards 3rd Edition from Amazon.com.

There’s a new book mini-site as well, with more content and features to come. The sharp-eyed will notice that the mini-site is set in Franklin Gothic. A web-licensed version of ITC Franklin Pro Medium from Font Bureau has been embedded via standard CSS. It works everywhere, even in IE. (View Source if curious.)

ShortURL: zeldman.com/x/57

36 thoughts on “What’s new in DWWS 3e”

  1. I knew it was gonna be blue, I’m also glad I remembered fire is hot. Pre-ordering tomorrow.

  2. I suspected the cover might be blue, it seemed the next logical choice!

    I am pre-ordering today. The books have always been good material to revisit time and again to remind me the WHY and HOW of modern web development. That the 3rd ed. is a serious overhaul is all the more appealing.

    And, BTW, nice work with the @font-face implementation – it is simpler than I thought. Need to start using it!

  3. I remember reading the first edition of DWWS cover-to-cover on a train from New York to Florida. I couldn’t put it down. Each page brought a new sense of enlightenment. The second edition stirred the same feelings. I can’t wait to get my hands on the newest copy. DWWS is the bible of web standards.

    WWZD?

  4. Wooo hooo! When is the book coming out in the UK? I always have problems ordering on amazon.com, the book is not available on amazon.co.uk. will it ship to the UK if I order on amazon.com?

  5. @Stewart:

    Designing With Web Standards 3rd Edition is available for pre-order at Amazon.co.uk. It’s just not easy to find. Get it here. :)

    Presently the Amazon UK discount is lower than the Amazon US discount (and Amazon France offers no discount). Bummer.

    I think you can order from the Amazon US and get it shipped to the UK (you might even be able to log in with your UK account). Customs charges might apply, which would cancel any additional savings benefit of ordering from the US. For the quickest delivery and least hassle, it probably makes sense for UK folks to order via the UK website—unless someone knows otherwise.

  6. I have the first two sitting as prestigious bookends to my web dev book assortment at work. I’ll have to find a third prominent position somewhere within easy grasp.

    Jay-Z, have you ever thought of composing a fiction piece? Or perhaps an autobiography?

  7. Jay-Z, have you ever thought of composing a fiction piece? Or perhaps an autobiography?

    @Nick:

    How kind of you to ask this. I wrote three bad novels in my early 20s and fortunately failed to publish them. I’m not ready to try straight fiction again.

    My ex and a publisher friend have been encouraging me to write a semi-autobiographical quasi-fictional thingie. I expect I shall try.

  8. There’s a new book mini-site as well, with more content and features to come. The sharp-eyed will notice that the mini-site is set in Franklin Gothic. A web-licensed version of ITC Franklin Pro Medium from Font Bureau has been embedded via standard CSS. It works everywhere, even in IE.

    Works everywhere? Not in my G1 phone, it doesn’t. The G1 has a web browser based on Chrome, and it can show most web pages quite well. The book mini-site however displayed like one huge image without any text. A big fail (if the expression is permitted).

  9. Works everywhere? Not in my G1 phone, it doesn’t. The G1 has a web browser based on Chrome, and it can show most web pages quite well. The book mini-site however displayed like one huge image without any text. A big fail (if the expression is permitted).

    A big fail for Chrome, I agree. Chrome is based on Webkit, which supports @font-face. It’s sad that Google’s fork of Webkit does not support @font-face yet.

    When a browser does not support@font-face, it is supposed to show a system font instead.

    Failing to show any text at all is extraordinarily bad of the version of Chrome in the G1 phone. And when I say extraordinarily bad, I mean worse than Internet Explorer 4. (Which shows the text, and in the embedded web font.)

    Google is a rather frighteningly smart company, even if they are less concerned with aesthetics than they are with turning cabbage into shoe leather. (And they are not at all interested in turning cabbage into shoe leather.)

    Eventually—soon, I suspect—they’ll support @font-face like Firefox, Safari, and Opera do.

    Thanks for letting me know about the problem in the G1 phone.

  10. Re: Buying books from Amazon.com (when you’re in Europe)- because books do not carry any tax, you do not get charged import tax. I bought a lot of books from Amazon.com when the dollars to euro rate fell in my favour, even with shipping it worked out really good. (Amazon.co.uk shipping rates are pretty steep to Ireland).
    I also really like the blue, I’m partial to the periwinkle blue

  11. Check this out:

    There will be a free online edition with the purchase of the book. Details are listed on the book’s last page. I just found this out. That seems pretty all right.

  12. Can’t wait to get my eyes & hands on it!!!! I hope to make it to AEA next year, since this year didn’t work out after attending 2 years in a row. Hope to steal you for a moment and maybe get it even singed ;)

  13. What about the French version of this 3rd edition? Any plans?

    Bien sur! I’m confident that there will be a French version. Translations usually come out about eighteen months after the publication of the original. This probably gives the international publisher time to verify that the original is in fact selling—no sense translating a book nobody wants to read—and then to hire the right translator, produce, print, and distribute the translated book.

    Je regrette I speak only one language. As a result, although DWWS has been translated into over a dozen languages, I can’t read any of them for pleasure, or verify their accuracy. When I consider my oddly jocular writing style, I wonder what the Chinese translator makes of it. I’d love to know if the playfulness of the English language version makes it into the Korean or Czech versions.

    Nabakov bypassed this problem by writing his novels in multiple languages. But he was Nabakov.

  14. I hope to make it to AEA next year, since this year didn’t work out after attending 2 years in a row. Hope to steal you for a moment and maybe get it even singed ;)

    Petra, I’ll be delighted to sign your book. I hope you can come!

  15. I consider my oddly jocular writing style, I wonder…

    French translation of the edition was great, except maybe for the “untranslatable” writing style. We have your blog for this. Can’t comment on the Chinese and Korean ones :)
    Well, I’ll have to keep on coding with my feet for the next 18 months…

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  17. A big fail for Chrome, I agree.

    Indeed… But that still means that the mini site does not work everywhere. So should we care? Don’t know… Maybe little used browsers don’t count.

    Anyway: It’s possible to give the G1 Chrome a helping hand. It pays attention to stylesheets linked like this:

    [link rel=”stylesheet” type=”text/css” href=”handheld.css” media=”handheld, only screen and (max-device-width: 480px)” /]

    But other “handhelds” might not use such stylesheets, so it’s not a universal solution. And some handhelds that might use it probably don’t need it. So what do we do?

    Maybe there’s a chapter on this in the book..

  18. For what it’s worth, the font on the mini-site doesn’t render as Franklin on any of my IEs – 6, 7 or 8. I’m not sure why that is. The degrade is graceful enough, although if the ‘section’ div were 650px wide rather than 550, the headline wouldn’t wrap in the fallback sans-serif, and it’d look “nicer”. IMO.

    As far as handhelds, the page looks fine in Blazer and Opera Mini on my not-very-modern Palm Centro. System font of course, but I would have been astonished to see anything else.

  19. @Phil Stewart-Jones:

    It’s a file reference problem. IE requires that the “font-family” line use the font’s name, not the file name, e.g. “Franklin Medium,” not “FranklinITCPro-Med.” Because this is a custom font, it uses a custom name, and my OS doesn’t reveal that name to me, because Mac OS doesn’t support EOT. I’ve sent a note to the manufacturer and expect to hear back today. Meantime, I’m guessing at alternate names.

    Please have a look in IE and see if it’s working now. You’ll know it’s working, because you’ll see Franklin Gothic instead of a default Windows sans-serif.

    Thanks for helping me trouble-shoot!

  20. Indeed… But that still means that the mini site does not work everywhere. So should we care? [etc.]

    @Bertil Wennergren:

    Good points, sir.

    But using a handheld CSS to send the G1 phone a different style sheet wouldn’t fix the problem in desktop Chrome, and it would also deny the embedded font to other phone browsers that support @font-face but also read handheld CSS, such as Mobile Safari. Constructing a bug-driven workaround that sends one version of Webkit one CSS and another version of Webkit a different CSS may be possible, but it seems like a lot of quarters for a short dance.

    I’m inclined to sit this out and let Google fix it.

  21. I’ve not owned one of your previous editions, I’m sure they’re great but there’s just something about the web in a book that seems so outdated, hindering me investing in such a book…

  22. @Evan Skuthorpe:

    I know what you mean. But I’ve personally learned quite a lot about the web from books by David Siegel, Lynda Weinman, Jeff Veen, Steve Krug, Eric Meyer, Joe Clark, Dan Cederholm, Jeremy Keith, Andy Budd, Curt Cloninger, etc.

  23. Really looking forward to this. The first book really got me into web standards and why they are so important to the web in general. ANy ideas when we can get a copy of it in the UK?

  24. Any ideas when we can get a copy of it in the UK?

    @jason millward: Don’t have an exact date. US-published books generally take a month or two after the US release to show up in the UK. I blame the Tories.

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