Progressive Enhancement FTW with Aaron Gustafson

IN EPISODE № 130 of The Big Web Show (“Everything Web That Matters”), I interview long-time web standards evangelist Aaron Gustafson, author of Adaptive Web Design, on web design then and now; why Flipboard’s 60fps web launch is anti-web and anti-user; design versus art; and the 2nd Edition of Aaron’s book, coming from New Riders this year.

Enjoy Episode № 130 of The Big Web Show.

Show Links

A Bit About Aaron Gustafson
Adaptive Web Design: Crafting Rich Experiences with Progressive Enhancement
Responsive Issues Community Group
Easy Designs – Web Design, Development & Consulting
Web Standards Sherpa
Code & Creativity
WebStandardsProject (@wasp) | Twitter
A List Apart: For People Who Make Websites
Genesis – Land Of Confusion [Official Music Video] – YouTube

Marchgasm!

I’VE BEEN BUSY this month:

And March is only half over.

I’m an Entrepreneur, And You Can Too: FounderDating cofounder Jessica Alter on Big Web Show № 129

TODAY’S BIG WEB SHOW guest is Jessica Alter (@jalter), Cofounder & Chief Connector of FounderDating, “a Linkedin for entrepreneurs.” Jessica and I discuss growing an online community while maintaining quality and avoiding spam and anti-patterns; how to become an advisor or cofounder; the biggest mistake budding entrepreneurs make; getting to your first customers; why the people side of things—experiential information—is more important than ever (and more important than fundraising); and how listeners can empower themselves to become entrepreneurs.

Sponsored by DreamHost and An Event Apart.

Listen to Episode № 128 of The Big Web Show.

URLs

founderdating.com
twitter.com/jalter
twitter.com/founderdating

The Arc of a Design Career: Khoi Vinh on The Big Web Show № 128

Khoi Vinh, photographed by Khoi Vinh

KHOI VINH IS my guest in Episode № 128 of The Big Web Show (“Everything Web That Matters”).

Khoi is a web and graphic designer, blogger, and former design director for The New York Times, where he worked from January 2006 until July 2010. Prior to that, Khoi co-founded and was design director for Behavior, a New York digital design studio. He is the author of  How They Got There: Interviews With Digital Designers About Their Careers (coming in 2015) and Ordering Disorder: Grid Principles for Web Design (New Riders, 2010), and was a leading proponent of bringing grid-based graphic design principles to web design in the mid-2000s. In 2011, Fast Company named him one of “The 50 Most Influential Designers in America.”

Listen to Episode № 128 of The Big Web Show.

URLs

http://www.subtraction.com
https://twitter.com/khoi
http://howtheygotthere.us
http://trywildcard.com
http://www.nytimes.com/2008/04/21/business/media/21askthetimes.html
http://www.creativebloq.com/khoi-vinh-using-sketch-instead-photoshop-6133901
http://www.behaviordesign.com
http://vllg.com/constellation/galaxie-polaris


Sponsored by DreamHost.

Big Web Show № 127: Those Who Can Teach with Jared Spool

Jared Spool of Center Centre and User Interface Engineering

IN EPISODE № 127 of The Big Web Show, Jared Spool of User Interface Engineering and I discuss the goals and workings of Center Centre, a new school Jared cofounded with Dr Leslie Jensen Inman to create the next generation of industry-ready UX designers. Topics include “teaching students to learn,” what schools can and can’t do, working with partner companies, “Project Insanity,” and designing a program to make students industry-ready.

WEBSITES & URLS MENTIONED

Center Centre
User Interface Engineering
@jmspool
@UIE
@CenterCentre
UX Mobile Immersion
Unicorn Institute
Brain Sparks (UX writing by Jared and others)
All You Can Learn

Pick Up Hicks

Jon Hicks

JON HICKS. One of twelve great reasons to attend An Event Apart Boston 2015. Zeldman.com fans, save $100 at registration using discount code AEAZELD.

Jon Hicks is a Graphic Designer based in Oxfordshire, UK. He runs Hicksdesign with his wife Leigh and is most widely known for his work on the Firefox, Mailchimp, and Shopify logos, as well as recent projects such as the Skype emoticon redesign. He also quite literally wrote the book on Icons: The Icon Handbook for Five Simple Steps Publishing.

Big Web Show № 125: “You’re My Favorite Client” with Mike Monteiro

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Monteiro and I talk design:

Designers Mike Monteiro (author, “You’re My Favorite Client”) and Jeffrey Zeldman discuss why humility is expensive, how to reassure the client at every moment that you know what you’re doing, and how to design websites that look as good on Day 400 as they do on Day 1. Plus old age, unsung heroines of the early web, and a book for designers to give to their clients.

5by5 | The Big Web Show № 125: “You’re My Favorite Client,” with Mike Monteiro.

Designer Blindness

AFTER USING the web for twenty years, and software for an additional ten, I’ve come to believe that I suffer from an affliction which I will hereby call “designer blindness.”

Put simply, if an interface is poorly designed, I will not see the data I looked for, even if it is right there on the page.

On a poorly designed table, I don’t find the column containing the answer I sought.

On a poorly designed interface, I don’t push the right buttons.

On a poorly designed social sharing site, I delete my data when I mean to save it, because the Delete button is in the place most designers put a Save button.

This doesn’t happen to everyone, which is why I call it an affliction. Indeed, it happens to almost no one.

My non-designer friends and family seem quite capable of using appallingly designed (and even undesigned) sites and applications. Somehow they just muddle through without pushing the button that erases their work.

In fact, the less concerned with aesthetics and usability these friends and family members are, the more easily they navigate sites and applications I can’t make head nor hair of.

Like the ex-girlfriend who mastered Ebay.

Or the colleagues who practically live in Microsoft Excel, an application I still cannot use. There are tabs on the bottom, way below the fold, way past where the data stops? And I’m supposed to scroll a blank page until I find those tabs? It’s easy for most people, but it never occurs to me no matter how often I open an Excel document. I could open a thousand Excel documents and still never think to scroll past a wall of empty rows to see if, hidden beneath them, there is a tab I need to click. Just doesn’t occur to me. Because, design.

It’s not a visual or mathematical disability. If something is well designed, I can generally use it immediately. It’s the logic of design that trips me up.

I recognize that I’m an edge case—although I bet I’m not the only designer who feels this way. Give me something that is well designed, and I will master it, teach others about it, and unconsciously steal my next five original ideas from it. Give me something poorly designed, something that works for most people, and I’ll drive a tank into an orphanage.

Not that I’m a great designer. I wouldn’t even call myself a good designer. I’m just good enough to get messed up by bad design.

Yet you won’t hear me complain about my designer blindness.

See, divorce is a terrible thing, but if you have a kid, it’s all worth it. The heartache, the anger, the loss of income and self-esteem, the feeling that no matter what you say or do, you are going to be someone else’s monster forever—all the unbearable burdens of failed love and a broken family are worth it if, before that love failed, it brought a wonderful child to this world.

For my daughter I would suffer through a thousand divorces, a million uncomfortable phone calls, a trillion emotionally fraught text messages.

And how I feel about my kid is how I also feel about my design affliction. The pain of being unable to use what works for other folks is more than compensated for by the joy of recognizing great design when I see it—and the pleasure of striving to emulate that greatness, no matter how badly I fail every time.

A Holiday Wish

We are all designers. You may call yourself a front-end developer, but if you spend hours shaving half-seconds off an interaction, that’s user experience and you, my friend, are a designer. If the client asks, “Can you migrate all my old content to the new CMS?” and you answer, “Of course we can, but should we?”, you are a designer. Even our users are designers. Think about it.

ON THE TITLES that divide, and the spirit that unites us: My Holiday Wish for all people who make websites—in today’s 24ways.

Big Web Show № 123: Why Clients Spend More on Toilets Than Design

Andy Budd

DESIGNER Andy Budd and I discuss why clients spend more on toilet cleaning than design; honest pitching; the ins and outs of agile pricing; modular code libraries; selling web services instead of deliverables; the maturation of our industry since the mid-1990s; the value of reputation; design as a collaborative process; how and why agencies get invited to pitch; passion as studio marketing; our field’s evolution from layout-making to strategic design thinking; and much more.

Enjoy Big Web Show № 123: Leading a Design Agency with Clearleft’s Andy Budd.