Front-end devs, An Event Apart is hiring.

An Event ApartAN EVENT APART, the design conference for people who make websites, seeks a freelance, part-time, front-end developer to work with our web designer, creative director, and project manager on ongoing design and UX improvements to our site at

You have a mastery of HTML, CSS (including Flexbox), and JavaScript. You’re a thinker who cares about good user experience and knows that the smallest design details matter. Progressive enhancement is your bread; mobile-first responsive design is your butter. Sweating web performance details is your idea of Saturday night; arguing the semantics of blockquote, your idea of Heaven.

For details, and to apply, see our listing on

On Web Performance

Lara Hogan

GET READY for Lara Hogan, author of Designing For Performance, as she shares pretty much about everything you’ll need to know to design optimally performant front-end web experiences. It’s one of twelve essential sessions that make An Event Apart Austin 2015 the Southwest’s don’t-miss web design and development event of 2015.

Co-Design, Not Redesign, by Kevin M. Hoffman – An Event Apart Video

Kevin M. Hoffman

MOVE from the nightmare of design by committee to the joys of design collaboration.

In this 60-minute video captured live at An Event Apart Orlando: Special Edition, Kevin M. Hoffman explains how service design thinking, lean approaches to user experience, and co-design processes offer an alternative to the usual (expensive) design project frustrations, and deliver experiences to delight your users.

Source: An Event Apart News: Co-Design, Not Redesign, by Kevin M. Hoffman – An Event Apart Video

Screen Time: An Event Apart Video by Luke Wroblewski

Luke Wroblewski at An Event Apart Orlando: Special Edition

FULL-LENGTH FRIDAY is here again! Enjoy another great 60-minute presentation ℅ An Event Apart, the design conference for people who make websites:

In this 60-minute video captured live at An Event Apart Orlando: Special Edition, designer, entrepreneur, and author Luke Wroblewski takes us deep into what today’s world of multiple, simultaneous screen use means for web and interaction designers.

Source: An Event Apart News: Screen Time: An Event Apart Video by Luke Wroblewski

Next Generation CSS Layout With Rachel Andrew

SINCE the early days of the web, designers have been trying to lay out web pages using grid systems. Likewise, almost every CSS framework attempts to implement some kind of grid system, using floats and often leaning on preprocessors.

The CSS Grid Layout module brings us a native CSS Grid system for the first time—a grid system that does not rely on document source order, and can create complex layouts which are easily redefined with media queries.

In Rachel Andrews’s “CSS Grid Layout” session at An Event Apart Boston 2015, by following along with practical examples, you’ll learn how Grid works, and how it can be used to implement modern layouts and responsive designs.

More at An Event Apart.

Pick Up Hicks

Jon Hicks

JON HICKS. One of twelve great reasons to attend An Event Apart Boston 2015. fans, save $100 at registration using discount code AEAZELD.

Jon Hicks is a Graphic Designer based in Oxfordshire, UK. He runs Hicksdesign with his wife Leigh and is most widely known for his work on the Firefox, Mailchimp, and Shopify logos, as well as recent projects such as the Skype emoticon redesign. He also quite literally wrote the book on Icons: The Icon Handbook for Five Simple Steps Publishing.

The Long Web – An Event Apart Video

Jeremy Keith at An Event Apart

IN THIS 60-minute video caught live at An Event Apart Austin, Jeremy Keith bets on HTML for the long haul:

The pace of change in our industry is relentless. New frameworks, processes, and technologies are popping up daily. If you’re feeling overwhelmed, you are not alone. Let’s take a step back and look at the over-arching trajectory of web design. Instead of focusing all our attention on the real-time web, let’s see which design principles and development approaches have stood the test of the time. Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it, but those who can learn from the past will create a future-friendly web.

Enjoy The Long Web by Jeremy Keith – An Event Apart Video.

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The Page, The Stage

EVERY YEAR I give a new talk at An Event Apart. And every year I panic.

After nearly two decades, public speaking no longer frightens me. But deciding what needs to be said gets tougher, and more terrifying, each year.

In 1998, when Hasan Yalcinkaya hired me to give my first public web design talk in, of all places, his glorious city of Istanbul, I wrote a speech for the occasion and read it aloud from the stage.

The following year, when Jim Heid hired me to keynote Web Design World Denver, I intended to do the same thing. But a fellow Web Design World speaker named Jeff Veen (who was also a colleague on The Web Standards Project) persuaded me to throw out my speech and “just tell stories.” I did it, it worked, and I’ve done it ever since.

For all my An Event Apart presentations since starting the conference with Eric Meyer in 2005, I’ve designed slides outlining the parameters of what I intended to talk about, and then spoken off the cuff.

But this year, inspired by the rigorous (and highly effective) speech preparation regimes of my friends Karen McGrane and Mike Monteiro, I’m once again writing a speech out word for word in advance. I will polish it like a manuscript. Only when it is perfect—logically structured, funny, passionate, persuasive—will I design accompanying slides.

I may read the speech out loud, word for word, as Mike sometimes does, or I may revise and practice it so often that I no longer need to see it to say it, like Karen. Either way, my talk this year should be tighter than any I’ve given in the past decade. Hopefully, that’s saying something.

I’m grateful to all my friends for their inspiration, and delighted that the panic and terror I felt at the start of this year, while contemplating creating a new AEA talk, has turned into the inspiration to approach the task a different way.

How do you approach public speaking? And if you don’t speak, what part of you is holding the rest of you back?