HTML5 For Web Designers Sells Out

HTML5 For Web Designers, by Jeremy Keith

The first printing of Jeremy Keith’s HTML5 For Web Designers has sold out.

For a book about web forms, semantics, and the history of markup, it’s done pretty well:

  • The book sold 1,000 copies during the first hour of pre-sales.
  • It sold 5,000 copies during the first 24 hours of pre-sales.
  • The first printing sold out within two months.

Haven’t ordered yours yet, and now they’re sold out? Not to worry: a second printing is in the works; orders will ship the week of July 26.

So where’s my book, already?

We ship worldwide. Orders generally ship within 3 days and take 7–10 days to arrive. Some orders take longer, typically because of hold-ups at your local post office, over which we have no control. (Intriguingly, foreign orders shipped quickly, in many cases arriving much sooner than US orders.) We have expedited all remaining shipments to get you your book faster.

We ship via US Postal Service, so no tracking numbers are available.

If you ordered before June 30 and still have not received your order, please be patient a few more days, and thank you for bearing with our learning curve. We know a lot about web design, but we’re still getting the hang of interpreting what mail houses and the US Postal Service mean by “guaranteed fast shipping.”

If you need to speak to someone about your order, write to us.

I want an ebook, not a dead tree! What gives?

Stay tuned; we’re working on ebook versions. Follow @abookapart to learn when they’re released.

33 thoughts on “HTML5 For Web Designers Sells Out”

  1. Congratulations.
    Can’t wait to see a rainbow of spines on my shelf with dogeared corners and placeholder subscription cards sticking out the top of them.

    Go, go, go!

  2. Kai: No problem! We know people are excited about the digital version. It is probably a month or two away. Watch the AEA Twitter feed (and of course, I’ll announce here too).

    :)

  3. Congratulations Jeffrey. It is great to see the continued success of ALA, AEA, and now ABA.

  4. Every day for the past few, I’ve returned home after work, hoping that it’s on the floor. Thanks for the update – good to know that it’s sold well, but even better to know that it should be with me soon.

  5. I’m curious to know why the ebook version is taking so long?

    Why not just make a PDF of the print book, and sell it? And offer the epub version when it is available for free?

    Not criticizing, just curious about what issues ebook publishing has compared to print.

  6. I ordered on Monday before the sell out notice. Will I have to wait till the second print run to get mine or are these orders being fulfilled now?

  7. I ordered on Monday before the sell out notice. Will I have to wait till the second print run to get mine or are these orders being fulfilled now?

    From here, that’s too close to call. At worst, your order will ship the week of July 26—a few days from now. If it helps, you will surely get your copy of the book before I receive my iPhone 4, which I ordered from Apple last week.

  8. I’m curious to know why the ebook version is taking so long?

    To be honest, we initially intended to create printed copies of our books only. We are huge book nerds and we adored the idea of lovingly curating, editing, and designing real books just when the book industry was slitting its own throat or turning to the iPad as a potential savior. (I exaggerate of course, but with love, and to make a point.) We were so fixed on the notion of crafting small, beautiful, extremely useful books for our people of the web, that we didn’t even bother coming up with an epub strategy.

    Naive? Certainly. Absurd? In hindsight, clearly. We were so gonzo for book-os, and we worked so hard to be sure we could deliver books to nearly any corner of the globe, that we didn’t anticipate how high demand for ebook versions would be.

    But as soon as we announced our first title, we were deluged with ebook requests.

    We took some time to adjust our thinking, and agreed that if our readers wanted ebooks, they should have ebooks—ebooks done our way, with the same high quality of our printed versions.

    Now, if ebooks are part of your strategy from the get-go, then you will author your book in XHTML and CSS. (That’s the best approach, and the one that’s most likely to create a good ebook.) We hadn’t taken that approach because we hadn’t anticipated creating ebooks.

    Alternately, if you must, you can do your authoring in InDesign, and create the InDesign files in such a way as to facilitate the conversion to epub. Not everyone in our industry is experienced at using InDesign this way (and we certainly aren’t), and the process is hardly foolproof—lots can go wrong, you really have to know what you’re doing. But it can be done. If. You. Create. Your. InDesign. Files. To. Facilitate. ePub. Conversion.

    We didn’t do that, because we had no epub strategy and had no idea of creating ebooks.

    We set up our InDesign file in a great way for creating a book, but the worst possible way for eventually converting to ebook.

    After researching what was involved, our best option was to take our non-ebook-friendly InDesign file to one of the few experts in the world who knows how to turn a file like ours into a great ebook. The process is laborious and such expertise does not come cheap. We are thrilled with the expert consultant we chose, and we should have a file very soon.

    Thanks for your interest in HTML5 For Web Designers.

  9. We received our copy of HTML5 for Web Designers this week, and it’s fantastic. I haven’t read it all yet, as short as it is, but the design is as beautiful as one would expect from Mr. Santa Maria. What I love about it, besides its design, is how small and short it is. It almost feels like a short journal from Mr. Keith on the intricacies of HTML5. It’s more personal than your typical book, and it feels special. That’s something you don’t get in a lot of books these days.

  10. I missed the whole part about why it isn’t available at major retailers (like Amazon or B&N). I’m sure there are compelling reasons not to sell through them. But I have many compelling reason to buy through them. I purchased my “Designing with Web Standards” (a book that completely changed my view on web design [for the better], thank you, Jeffrey) from B&N off the shelf. Why not this one, too?

    I’m still going to buy the book… I just feel weird using PayPal. Maybe I’m in the minority disliking PayPal so much. But just as you like physical books so much, so too I like physical book stores.

  11. The reason for not making a PDF of epub of the books is just money. It’s a lot easier for someone to duplicate it and pass out copies of an ebook than a print copy.

  12. Congratulations to all involved in this, it is certainly a success well deserved.

    I’ve only just sat down to start reading it, after having it delivered to my parents address due to a move during the shipping period, and then leaving it there by accident when I finally got to pick it up. Its amazingly beautiful, and a great read.

    So congratulations once again, and a big thank you to all involved.

    Looking forward to then next book.

  13. When I tried to order it, I always got an error when I clicked the payment button through PayPal. It kept saying that there was a problem with the order and the originating web site. So after the third attempt over a two-week period in June I gave up. I’m glad there’s going to be a second edition, but if I can’t buy the book because of a damn server error I’m going to kick someone.

  14. It’s great to hear you’ve sold out already. Reassuring even.
    It’s a beautifully written and presented book, and Jeremy has done a masterful job explaining and presenting HTML5 for us.
    After a long wait for it to arrive, it was devoured in a couple of hours – very much looking forward to the next in the ABA series.

  15. Glad I’m a friend on FB so I could find out what’s happening. Been anxiously waiting for it to arrive but been to busy designing to bug the procurement people for follow up. BTW, for future mailings, USPS does have tracking, it’s called delivery confirmation and works GREAT!! We have shipped items for years (as an artist) and Delivery Confirmation is the way to go. At least that way they – the post office – has to be accountable. Just an idea. Looking forward to getting the book! Was great to see you guys in Seattle this spring :-)

  16. Intriguingly, foreign orders shipped quickly, in many cases arriving much sooner than US orders

    You’re right, mine arrived with me in the UK rather snappily while many Americans were still waiting.

    It’s an excellent book, as expected, and even though I’ve been following HTML5 quite closely, I learned a lot and was compelled to get straight into coding as soon as I reached the back cover. Also, like you said when you first talked about it, I’ll be keeping the book close by for a while as a reference.

    Personally, I share your original position on the ebook issue – for me the $9 to ship the dead tree version was more than worth it. It just won’t be the same on screen, although I’m sure you’ll do as good a job of it as is humanly possible.

    I’m very much looking forward to the next one now. Would it be Mr. Marcotte’s that you mentioned on TBWS recently?

  17. Its amazingly beautiful, and a great read.

    Thank you, Dean.

    When I tried to order it, I always got an error when I clicked the payment button through PayPal. It kept saying that there was a problem with the order and the originating web site. So after the third attempt over a two-week period in June I gave up. I’m glad there’s going to be a second edition, but if I can’t buy the book because of a damn server error I’m going to kick someone.

    Phillip, that sounds terribly frustrating! We have not had any similar reports (thank goodness) ,but that doesn’t make your experience any better. If it happens again, email us (a book apart at g mail dot com) and we’ll arrange to sell you a copy by check.

    The reason for not making a PDF of epub of the books is just money. It’s a lot easier for someone to duplicate it and pass out copies of an ebook than a print copy.

    Jane, that wasn’t our reason for not initially planning an ebook version. Our reason. as I explained in an earlier comment, was just that we love printed books so much and wanted to create a series of them.

  18. I’m very much looking forward to the next one now. Would it be Mr. Marcotte’s that you mentioned on TBWS recently?

    The next book in the series features Dan Cederholm on CSS3. The writing is nearly finished. Following that, having at least initially addressed the two technologies (HTML5 and CSS3) that are driving a tremendous amount of change, we will publish a series on modern best practices in web design, including progressive enhancement, practical content strategy, responsive web design, and emotional design. As always, these books will be brief, to the point, and highly focused. I’m not going to list all the authors here but they are great authors you know and love. More will be revealed!

  19. Congrats! For such a small book it really is packed with lots of great info. Jeremy Keith did a fantastic job! I blew through on the train and then have been actually referring back to the code in it as well so it really is a great little reference guide of sorts.

    I am also a big fan of your blog and tweets! :) Keep up the good work and keep it comin’!

  20. I was so happy when I got my copy – it was beautiful and Jeremy’s writing is spectacular.

    I’m so happy to see it doing so well!

  21. I am rather excited my copy arrived at my place on the 15th. Left undamaged and unmarked, on top of it. I look forward to building up a collection from ABA.

  22. Thrilled to come home to my copy yesterday! Congratulations all around, ABA-folk. In addition, I will be interested to read more about your epub generating experience in the future.

  23. Love the book, love the format (slim, concise, etc.), BUT I do have an issue with the production: the cover ought to be at least varnished — the combo of stock and printing is partial to unsightly scratches and such that really stand out on that orange…
    Next time varnish or laminate, please.

    On another note: are you guys going to offer a subscription plan for the series? I would go for that in a sec!

  24. Jeffrey, thanks for the insight into the delays. Waiting anxiously for the ePub, especially since I know how much hard work you’re putting into preparing a great ebook.

    Also, looking forward to the book on CSS3 as well.

  25. Jeffrey,

    I appriciate your explanation for the ebook delay, honesty is always the best policy.

    I will wait, another month will not kill me and I now know you will put the same love in the epub version as you have in the printed one.

    So, thanks very much guys!

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